Safety

Safety

When you bring contractors onto your site, it is important that you ensure that they have a clear understanding of safety and security procedures. This is generally established via the contractor induction. 

Contractor induction materials can be in the form of a simple printed sheet, a presentation, on line or offline or a video.  

Ideally, a member of your organisation’s staff should talk through the  induction with the contractor.  At the end of this, it is usual to ask them to sign and date a document to say they have read and understood the rules.  Be aware that not all contractors and sub-contractors may be able to read English. 

This page sets out some of the items that you may wish to cover in your contractor induction. Links to examples of contractor induction documents are at the bottom of this page.

Contractor induction - key points to cover

About the site

- key information about the size and layout of the site

- location and/or addresses of important buildings

- a map of the site

- location of toilets

- location of first aid

 

Emergency contacts

- fm contact telephone numbers

- back-up telephone numbers, including out of hours services

- general switchboard number

- nearest hospital A&E department

 

Access information

- where should they arrive on site

- what are the site operating hours

- what are the out-of-hours arrangements

- where should delivery vans unload

- parking information

 

Fire safety

- information on fire alarm tests

- fire alarm instructions

- fire marshal information

- location of assembly points

- basic fire safety instructions

 

Site Security

- contact details for security team on site

- location of security desk

- discussion of responsibility for contractors’ tools and materials

- instructions regarding presentation and visibility of ID cards

- instructions about ensuring the site is secure

- warning against giving access to unidentified individuals

- procedures for getting doors opened for deliveries or works

Sub-contractors

- procedures for bringing sub-contractors on site

Accident emergency procedures

- your organisational requirements

Site safety

- a clear statement of your commitment to operating a safe site

- general guidelines on site safety - see the note below

Works guidelines

Note: detailed requirements relating to permits to work , risk assessments and managing site safety should form part of the formal contract which you have agreed with contractors. These requirements are outside the scope of these general guidelines.

Examples

HSE Guidance (pdf file) on delivering contractor induction for smaller sites

Keele University - uses a video

Unversity of Northumbria (pdf file) 

West Suffolk NHS (pdf file, 12 pages)

New regulations on storing petrol

Oct 9th 2014 -- Annette McGill

A new law on storing petrol came into force at the beginning of October 2014.

Charities may well store petrol for mowers, vans or buses. It is easy to overlook a petrol can in a corner of a shed. But the HSE warns that petrol is highly flammable and can give off vapour which can easily be set on fire. This means there is always a risk of a fire and/or an explosion if there is any source of ignition nearby.

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HSE launches new web resource to combat Occupational Disease

May 18th 2014 -- Annette McGill

HSE has launched a new website to help organisations prevent work-related illnesses. 

Occupational disease is a big problem: in 2011/12 there were an estimated 1.1 million working people suffering from a work-related illness, with around 450,000 new cases of work-related ill health. An estimated 12,000 deaths each year are caused by past exposures to harmful substances at work.

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Nearly Half of Repair and Refurb Sites fail Safety Checks

Nov 1st 2013 -- Annette McGill

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) says it found dangerous practices and poor standards at nearly half the repair and refurbishments sites it visited in September.

As part of a nationwide construction safety campaign, HSE inspectors visited 2,607 sites where refurbishment or repair work was taking place. Basic safety standards were not being met on 1,105 sites. 

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Bangladesh Building Collapse highlights the Ethics of Procurement

May 1st 2013 -- Annette McGill

The collapse of a factory building in Bangladesh last week has tragically emphasised the issue of ethical procurement. Charities have a special responsibility to source products in a responsible way.  Some charities are leading the way with detailed ethical procurement  policies covering safety, working conditions and wages. 

The regulatory requirements for workplace temperatures are set by the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992.   The regulations state that the temperature of indoor workplaces should be "reasonable".

What is the Legal Minimum Working Temperature?

There is no legal minimum working temperature.

However the Approved Code of Practice defines a reasonable indoor temperature as being normally at least 16°C.  If the work undertaken is heavy physical work, the temperature should be at least 13°C.​

What is the Legal Maximum Working Temperature?

There is no legally set upper limit for indoor working temperatures.  This is because factors like humidity and air movement can make a significant difference to thermal comfort levels.  The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) recommends that employers should consult with employees or their representatives, to establish ways to cope with high temperatures.

Guidance

The HSE website has guidance on temperatures in the workplace, as well as information about protecting people working outdoors and protective equipment: HSE Temperature Pages

 

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